Apostolic Palace  

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Triumph of Christianity by Tommaso Laureti (1530-1602), ceiling painting in the Sala di Constantino, Vatican Palace. Images like this one celebrate the destruction of ancient pagan culture and the victory of Christianity.
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Triumph of Christianity by Tommaso Laureti (1530-1602), ceiling painting in the Sala di Constantino, Vatican Palace. Images like this one celebrate the destruction of ancient pagan culture and the victory of Christianity.

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
grotesque art, Raphael Rooms

The Apostolic Palace, also called the Sacred Palace, the Papal Palace or the Palace of the Vatican, is the official residence of the Pope in the Vatican City.

The palace is a complex of buildings, comprising the Papal Apartments, some of the Catholic Church's government offices, a handful of chapels, the Vatican Museums and the Vatican Library. In all, there are over 1,000 rooms with the most famous including Raphael's Rooms and the Sistine Chapel with its renowned ceiling frescoes painted by Michelangelo (restored between 1980 and 1990).

The other papal residences are at the Lateran Palace, and the Castel Gandolfo outside Rome. The Vatican Palace displaced the Lateran Palace in prominence during the fifteenth century; but it was eclipsed for an extended period by the Quirinal Palace.

Before 1871, the Quirinal Palace was the Pope's official residence. After the final overthrow of the Papal States in 1870, the King of Italy confiscated that palace in 1871, making it the King's official residence. After the abolition of the Italian monarchy in 1946 it became the residence of the President of the Italian Republic.

Popular culture

The Apostolic Palace appears as a Wonder of the World in the Beyond the Sword expansion for Sid Meier's Civilization IV, though the graphic representation is that of St. Peter's Basilica.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Apostolic Palace" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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