Aphrodisiac  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

"[W]hilst in many places the effect of Ulysses on the reader undoubtedly is somewhat emetic, nowhere does it tend to be an aphrodisiac." --Judge John M. Woolsey

Image:Birth of Venus Botticelli.jpg
This page Aphrodisiac is part of the love series.
Illustration: The Birth of Venus (detail), a 1486 painting by Sandro Botticelli

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

An aphrodisiac is an agent which increases sexual desire. The name comes from the Greek goddess of sensuality Aphrodite.

Throughout history, many foods, drinks, and behaviors have had a reputation for making sex more attainable and/or pleasurable. However, from a historical and scientific standpoint, the desired results may be because their users have chosen to believe they will be effective (the placebo effect). Medical science has not substantiated claims that any particular food increases sexual desire or performance.

Some aphrodisiacs appear to gain their reputation from the principles of sympathetic magic, e.g. oysters, due to their shape. This also explains the trade in the phallic-looking horn of the rhinoceros, which is endangering this animal. Other animal-based aphrodisiacs gain their reputation from the apparent virility or aggressiveness of the animal source — such as tiger penis — also endangering the species.

Popular culture

The invention of an Aphrodisiac is the basis of a number of films including Perfume: The Story of a Murderer, Spanish Fly, She'll Follow You Anywhere and Love Potion No. 9. The first segment of Woody Allen's Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex* (*But Were Afraid to Ask) is called "Do Aphrodisiacs Work?", and casts Allen as a court jester trying to seduce the queen.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Aphrodisiac" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools