Anti-establishment  

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"May the last king be strangled in the bowels of the last priest" --Denis Diderot [...]

 This page Anti-establishment is part of the non-mainstream series Illustration: True portrait of Monsieur Ubu by Alfred Jarry.
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This page Anti-establishment is part of the non-mainstream series
Illustration: True portrait of Monsieur Ubu by Alfred Jarry.

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

An anti-establishment view or belief is one that goes against the conventional social, political, and economic principles of a society. The term was first used in the modern sense in 1958, by the British magazine New Statesman to refer to its political and social agenda. The term can be distinguished from counterculture, a word normally used to describe artistic rather than political movements that run against the prevailing taste and values of the time.

Although the term has retained its original meaning in British English and continues to be applied to various individuals and groups, in American English the term is used more specifically to describe certain social and political movements that occurred during the 1950s and 1960s.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Anti-establishment" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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