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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Anti is (From Ancient Greek ἀντί (antí, “against”) means against, opposed to.

Contents

Prefix anti-

  1. Against, hostile to.
    anti-clericalism
  2. Opposite of, reverse.
    antimatter
  3. Counteracting, neutralizing.
    antibacterial

Anti-aesthetics

Anti-art

anti-art

Anti-art is the definition of a work which may be exhibited or delivered in a conventional context but makes fun of serious art or challenges the nature of art. A work such as Marcel Duchamp's Fountain of 1917 is a prime example of anti-art. It is a Dadaist work of art. Much of Dadaism is associated with the quality of being anti-art. While the Dada movement per se was generally confined to Western Europe in the early 1900s, anti-art has a wider scope.

Anti-design

anti-design

Anti-design is a movement that emerged in Italy during the later 1960s, following Ettore Sottsass's 1966 exhibition of 'superbox' furniture at the Milan Furniture Fair. Employing all the design values rejected by modernism, it embraced ephemerality, irony, kitsch, strong colors and distortions to undermine the purely functional value of an object, and question concepts of "good taste", and "good design".

Anti-film

anti-film

Anti-films are experimental films that do not respect the rules of fictional film. The early films of Andy Warhol are a good example. He forces us to watch a sleeping man during five hours in Sleep (1963) or shows us a eight hours and five minutes of continuous real time footage of a static Empire State Building in Empire (1964); Chris Marker, who made a film out of filmed photographic stills in La Jetée (1962).

Anti-novel

anti-novel

An antinovel is any experimental work of fiction that avoids the familiar conventions of the novel. The term was coined by the French philosopher and critic Jean-Paul Sartre. The antinovel usually fragments and distorts the experience of its characters, forcing the reader to construct the reality of the story from a disordered narrative. Notable examples of antinovels are Report on Probability A by Brian Aldiss, Hopscotch by Julio Cortázar and Yo-Yo Boing! by Giannina Braschi.

Social anti-'s

Anti-clericalism - anti-fashion - anti-hero - antisocial - anti-psychiatry - anti-philosophy

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Anti" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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