Anathema  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Anathema was originally used as a term for exile from the church, but evolved to mean "set apart, banished, denounced"; it later evolved to mean:

  1. to be formally set apart;
  2. banished, exiled, excommunicated;
  3. denounced, sometimes accursed; or
  4. a literary term.

In the Bible, it appears in conjunction with the word "maranatha".

Etymology

From Late Latin anathema (“curse, person cursed, offering”), from Ancient Greek ἀνάθεμα (anathema, “something dedicated, especially dedicated to evil”), from ἀνατίθημι (anatithēmi, “I set upon, offer as a votive gift”), from ἀνά (ana, “upon”) + τίθημι (tithēmi, “I put, place”). The Ancient Greek term was influenced by Hebrew חרם (herem), leading to the sense of "accursed," especially in Ecclesiastical writers.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Anathema" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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