American Barbizon school  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The American Barbizon School was a group of painters and style partly influenced by the French Barbizon school. American Barbizon artists concentrated on painting rural landscapes often including peasants or farm animals.


William Morris Hunt was the first American to work in the Barbizon style as he directly trained with Jean-François Millet in 1851-1853. When he left France, Hunt established a studio in Boston and worked in the Barbizon manner, bringing the style to the United States of America. The Barbizon approach was generally not accepted until the 1880s and reached its pinnacle of popularity in the 1890s.

Artists


References

  • Bermingham, Peter. American Art in the Barbizon Mood. London and Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1976.
  • Bermingham, Peter. American Art in the Barbizon Mood. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1975.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "American Barbizon school" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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