Alternative lifestyle  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search
 This page Alternative lifestyle is part of the publication bias list of the Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia, presented by Alfred Jarry.
Enlarge
This page Alternative lifestyle is part of the publication bias list of the Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia, presented by Alfred Jarry.

Moi qui criait famine
Et toi qui posais nue

I, who screamed hunger
and you who posed nude

--"La Bohème" (1966) by Charles Aznavour


"I want to be different, like everybody else I want to be like. I want to be just like all the different people. I have no further interest in being the same, because I have seen difference all around, and now I know that that's what I want. I don't want to blend in and be indistinguishable. I want to be part of the different crowd, and assert my individuality along with others who are different like me."--"It's Saturday" (1992) by King Missile

This page Alternative lifestyle is part of the queer series.Illustration: Toulouse-Lautrec wearing Jane Avril's Feathered Hat and Boa (ca. 1892), photo Maurice Guibert.
Enlarge
This page Alternative lifestyle is part of the queer series.
Illustration: Toulouse-Lautrec wearing Jane Avril's Feathered Hat and Boa (ca. 1892), photo Maurice Guibert.

Related e

Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Shop


Featured:

Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
Enlarge
Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel

An alternative lifestyle is a lifestyle diverse in respect to mainstream ones, or generally perceived to be outside the cultural norm.

The word gained currency in 1968 (Ngram, 2020), reaching a peak towards the final years of the 1990s.

Usually, but not always, it implies an affinity or identification within some matching subculture (e.g. hippies, goths and punks). Some people with alternative lifestyles mix elements from various subcultures (grunge musicians were often influenced by a mixture of the punk, hippie, emo and heavy metal subcultures).

Not all minority lifestyles are held to be "alternative", so the term tends to apply to newer forms of lifestyle, often based upon enlarged freedoms (especially in the sphere of social styles), or a decision to substitute another approach, or to not follow the usual expected path in most societies.

History

Alternative lifestyles and subcultures originated in the 1920s with the "flapper" movement, when women cut their hair and skirts short (as a symbol of freedom from oppression and the old way of living). Women in the flapper age were the first large group of females to practice pre-marital sex, dancing, cursing, and driving in modern America without scandal following them.

See History of subcultures in the 19th century.

Examples

The following are examples of

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Alternative lifestyle" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools