Alan Soble  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Alan Gerald Soble (born 1947) is an American philosopher and author of several books on the philosophy of sex.

Soble was born to William and Sylvia Soble in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on March 4 1947. He graduated in 1969 from Albright College with a B.S. in Biology. He completed his M.A. in Pharmacology at University at Buffalo in 1972, then went on at the same university to attain a Ph.D. in Philosophy in 1976.

Early in his professional career, Soble wrote papers in areas of Ethics and Epistemology. In the late 1970s he began to help articulate the fledgling specialty of the "Philosophy of Sex." He also founded The Society for the Philosophy of Sex & Love; its proceedings were published as Sex, Love, and Friendship.

In subsequent years, Soble has edited or written many works in this field. In late 2005 he completed the central reference work in the philosophy of sex, Sex from Plato to Paglia. Some of his essays on sexuality, love, and science have been translated into French, German, Portuguese, Italian, Hungarian, and Chinese.

He was University Research Professor at the University of New Orleans, from 1986 to 2006, but left New Orleans after his home was destroyed by the flooding caused by Hurricane Katrina. He is now Professor Emeritus of UNO and teaches in the Philadelphia area. The fifth edition (27 years after the first) of his The Philosophy of Sex appeared in July, 2007.

Selected publications

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Alan Soble" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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