Addicted to Love (song)  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

"Addicted To Love" is a song by Robert Palmer. It is the third song on the Riptide album. The most commonly heard version runs around four minutes, but the full album version runs a little over six minutes.

The song is unusual in that the intro drum solo is in the 7/4 time signature, while the remainder is in a more conventional (at least for pop music) 4/4 time signature.

It was originally intended to be duet with Chaka Khan. However, her record company at the time wouldn't grant her a release to work on Palmer's label, Island Records. Chaka Khan is still credited for the vocal arrangements in the album liner notes. The guitar part on the song is played by Andy Taylor, then a member of Duran Duran. Palmer met Taylor when they were both members of supergroup The Power Station.

Video

The music video was directed by Terence Donovan, in which Palmer's backing band is a group of mini-skirted identical women whose pale skin, strong makeup, and black hair makes them resemble the women in Patrick Nagel paintings. The video is notable for being the first (and last) one shown on long running UK music programme The Chart Show. Palmer recycled the video's "identical women" concept for the videos of three other songs of his; namely "I Didn't Mean to Turn You On" (also from Riptide), "Simply Irresistible" and the animated "Change His Ways" (both from Heavy Nova).



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Addicted to Love (song)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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