Adam and Eve on the Sistine Chapel ceiling  

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Hands of God and Adam (1500s) is a detail of the Sistine Chapel ceiling  by Michelangelo. It is a detail from Adam and Eve cycle
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Hands of God and Adam (1500s) is a detail of the Sistine Chapel ceiling by Michelangelo. It is a detail from Adam and Eve cycle
Image:Adam and Eve, temptation and banishment (Sistine Chapel ceiling by Michelangelo).jpg
Adam and Eve on the Sistine Chapel ceiling (1500s) of the Sistine Chapel ceiling by Michelangelo. It is a panel from Adam and Eve cycle

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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For the central section of the Sistine Chapel ceiling, Michelangelo has taken four episodes from the story of Adam and Eve as told in the first, second and third chapters of Genesis. In this sequence of three, two of the panels are large and one small.

In the first of the pictures, and one of the most widely recognised images in the history of painting, Michelangelo shows God reaching out to touch Adam, who, in the words of Vasari, is "a figure whose beauty, pose and contours are such that it seems to have been fashioned that very moment by the first and supreme creator rather than by the drawing and brush of a mortal man." From beneath the sheltering arm of God, Eve looks out, a little apprehensively.

The central scene, of God creating Eve from the side of the sleeping Adam God creating Eve from the side of the sleeping Adam[1], in context with shields and Ignudi (before restoration) has been taken in its composition directly from another Creation sequence, the relief panels that surround the door of the Basilica of San Petronio, Bologna by Jacopo della Quercia whose work Michelangelo had studied in his youth.

In the final panel of this sequence Michelangelo combines two contrasting scenes into one panel Adam and Eve: temptation and banishment[2] (restored), that of Adam and Eve taking fruit from the forbidden tree, Eve trustingly taking it from the hand of the Serpent and Adam eagerly picking it for himself; and their banishment from the Garden of Eden, where they have lived in the company of God, to the world outside where they have to fend for themselves and experience death.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Adam and Eve on the Sistine Chapel ceiling" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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