Abductive reasoning  

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Sherlock Holmes (right) and Dr. Watson, by Sidney Paget
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Sherlock Holmes (right) and Dr. Watson, by Sidney Paget

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Abduction is a method of logical inference introduced by Charles Sanders Peirce which comes prior to induction and deduction for which the colloquial name is to have a "hunch". Abductive reasoning starts when an inquirer considers of a set of seemingly unrelated facts, armed with an intuition that they are somehow connected. The term abduction is commonly presumed to mean the same thing as hypothesis; however, an abduction is actually the process of inference that produces a hypothesis as its end result.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Abductive reasoning" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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