A Statement in Support of the Freedom to Read  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The Evergreen Review July-August 1962 cover and first three pages featured A Statement in Support of the Freedom to Read[1].

The cover read "We the undersigned, strongly endorse Judge Samuel B. Epstein's defense of the freedom to read in his historic decision in the Tropic of Cancer case in Chicago. Judge Epstein, by stating that "the right to free utterance becomes a useless privilege when the freedom to read is restricted or denied," has put the issue of police censorship..."

It was followed by a list of approximately 100 editors and publishers with their affiliations.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "A Statement in Support of the Freedom to Read" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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