A Social History of Modern Art  

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"The nightmarish quality of Goya's Capricho 43 testifies to a sense of personal despair in his attempts to maintain the rational mind in the face of subjective experience, as set forth by Darwin"--Albert Boime, A Social History of Modern Art

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

A Social History of Modern Art is a book series by Albert Boime. It analyzes French art from the mid-18th century to the end of the 19th century, making connections between the art and subject matter to historical events at the time, such as the French Revolution and the rule of Napoleon Bonaparte. The four-volume, 3,000-page series, published over a two-decade period by the University of Chicago Press, includes Art in an Age of Revolution, 1750–1800 (1987); Art in an Age of Bonapartism, 1800–1815 (1990); Art in an Age of Counterrevolution, 1815–1848 (2004); and Art in an Age of Civil Struggle, 1848–1871 (2007).

Excerpt:

"Goya's animal-headed cavaliers, fops, doctors, and pedagogues with heads of asses, monkeys, or bulls, his grandiloquent parrots and bespectacled owls come straight out of the fabulist style of Iriarte."

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "A Social History of Modern Art" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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