Wisdom literature  

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-'''Sophia''' (Σoφíα, [[Greek language|Greek]] for "[[wisdom]]") is a central term in [[Hellenistic philosophy]] and [[Hellenistic religion|religion]], [[Platonism]], [[Gnosticism]], [[Eastern Orthodox Church|Orthodox Christianity]], [[Esoteric Christianity]], as well as [[Christian mysticism]]. [[Sophiology]] is a [[Philosophy|philosophical]] concept regarding [[wisdom]], as well as a [[Theology|theological]] concept regarding the wisdom of [[God]].+'''Wisdom literature''' is the [[genre]] of [[literature]] common in the [[Ancient Near East]]. This genre is characterized by sayings of [[wisdom]] intended to teach about divinity and about [[virtue]]. The key principle of wisdom literature is that whilst techniques of traditional story-telling are used, books also presume to offer insight and wisdom about nature and reality.
 + 
 +The most famous examples of wisdom literature are found in the [[Bible]].
==See also== ==See also==
-* [[-sophy]]+* [[Proverb]]
-* [[Sophism]]+* [[Mirror-of-princes writing]]
-* [[Sufism]]+* [[Conduct book]]
-* [[Valentinus (Gnostic)|Valentinus]]+* [[Self-help]]
-* [[Wisdom literature]]+* [[Eastern philosophy]]
 +* [[Apophthegmata Patrum]]
 + 
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Wisdom literature is the genre of literature common in the Ancient Near East. This genre is characterized by sayings of wisdom intended to teach about divinity and about virtue. The key principle of wisdom literature is that whilst techniques of traditional story-telling are used, books also presume to offer insight and wisdom about nature and reality.

The most famous examples of wisdom literature are found in the Bible.

See also





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Wisdom literature" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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