Sublime (philosophy)  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
Revision as of 09:45, 22 June 2007
WikiSysop (Talk | contribs)
(Sublime moved to Sublime (philosophy))
← Previous diff
Revision as of 09:47, 22 June 2007
WikiSysop (Talk | contribs)

Next diff →
Line 1: Line 1:
{{Template}} {{Template}}
-{{GFDL}}+In [[aesthetics]], the '''sublime''' (from the [[Latin]] ''sublimis'' (under the lintel, high, exalted)) is the quality of [[Transcendence (philosophy)|transcendent]] greatness, whether physical, moral, intellectual, metaphysical or artistic. The term especially refers to a greatness with which nothing else can be compared and which is beyond all possibility of calculation, measurement or imitation. This greatness is often used when referring to nature and its vastness.
 + 
 +The first study of the value of the sublime is the treatise ascribed to [[Longinus (literature)|Longinus]]: ''On the Sublime''. For Longinus, artistic genius was the skill of [[metaphor]].
 + 
 +Prior to the eighteenth century sublime was a term of [[rhetoric]] predominantly relevant to literary criticism. [[Edmund Burke]] and [[Immanuel Kant]] both investigated the subject (compare Burke’s ''[[A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful|Essay on the Sublime and Beautiful]]'', 1756, and Kant's ''[[Observations on the Feeling of the Beautiful and Sublime]]'', 1764). Both men distinguished the sublime from the beautiful. Later writers tend to include the sublime in the beautiful.{{GFDL}}

Revision as of 09:47, 22 June 2007

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

In aesthetics, the sublime (from the Latin sublimis (under the lintel, high, exalted)) is the quality of transcendent greatness, whether physical, moral, intellectual, metaphysical or artistic. The term especially refers to a greatness with which nothing else can be compared and which is beyond all possibility of calculation, measurement or imitation. This greatness is often used when referring to nature and its vastness.

The first study of the value of the sublime is the treatise ascribed to Longinus: On the Sublime. For Longinus, artistic genius was the skill of metaphor.

Prior to the eighteenth century sublime was a term of rhetoric predominantly relevant to literary criticism. Edmund Burke and Immanuel Kant both investigated the subject (compare Burke’s Essay on the Sublime and Beautiful, 1756, and Kant's Observations on the Feeling of the Beautiful and Sublime, 1764). Both men distinguished the sublime from the beautiful. Later writers tend to include the sublime in the beautiful.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Sublime (philosophy)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools