Sampling (music)  

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In [[music]], '''sampling''' is the act of taking a portion, or '''sample''', of one [[sound recording]] and reusing it as an [[musical instrument|instrument]] or element of a new recording. This is typically done with a [[sampler (musical instrument)|sampler]], which can be a piece of hardware or a [[computer software|computer program]] on a digital computer. Sampling is also possible with [[tape loop]]s or with [[vinyl record]]s on a [[phonograph]]. In [[music]], '''sampling''' is the act of taking a portion, or '''sample''', of one [[sound recording]] and reusing it as an [[musical instrument|instrument]] or element of a new recording. This is typically done with a [[sampler (musical instrument)|sampler]], which can be a piece of hardware or a [[computer software|computer program]] on a digital computer. Sampling is also possible with [[tape loop]]s or with [[vinyl record]]s on a [[phonograph]].
-Often "samples" consist of one part of a song, such as a [[break (music)|break]], used in another, for instance the use of the drum introduction from [[Led Zeppelin]]'s "[[When the Levee Breaks]]" in songs by the [[Beastie Boys]], [[Dr. Dre]], [[Eminem]], [[Mike Oldfield]] and [[Erasure]], and the drum solo in "[[Funky Drummer]]".+Often "samples" consist of one part of a song, such as a [[break (music)|break]], used in another, for instance the use of the drum introduction from [[Led Zeppelin]]'s "[[When the Levee Breaks]]" and the drum solo in "[[Funky Drummer]]".
"Samples" in this sense occur often in [[Industrial music|industrial]], often using spoken words from movies and TV shows, as well as [[electronic music]] (which developed out of ''[[musique concrète]]'', based almost entirely on samples and sample-like parts), [[Hip hop music|hip hop]], developed from DJs repeating the breaks from songs (Schloss 2004, p.36), and Contemporary [[Rhythm and blues|R&B]], but are becoming more common in other music as well, such as by [[Slipknot (band)|Slipknot]]'s sample player [[Craig Jones]]. "Samples" in this sense occur often in [[Industrial music|industrial]], often using spoken words from movies and TV shows, as well as [[electronic music]] (which developed out of ''[[musique concrète]]'', based almost entirely on samples and sample-like parts), [[Hip hop music|hip hop]], developed from DJs repeating the breaks from songs (Schloss 2004, p.36), and Contemporary [[Rhythm and blues|R&B]], but are becoming more common in other music as well, such as by [[Slipknot (band)|Slipknot]]'s sample player [[Craig Jones]].
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In music, sampling is the act of taking a portion, or sample, of one sound recording and reusing it as an instrument or element of a new recording. This is typically done with a sampler, which can be a piece of hardware or a computer program on a digital computer. Sampling is also possible with tape loops or with vinyl records on a phonograph.

Often "samples" consist of one part of a song, such as a break, used in another, for instance the use of the drum introduction from Led Zeppelin's "When the Levee Breaks" and the drum solo in "Funky Drummer".

"Samples" in this sense occur often in industrial, often using spoken words from movies and TV shows, as well as electronic music (which developed out of musique concrète, based almost entirely on samples and sample-like parts), hip hop, developed from DJs repeating the breaks from songs (Schloss 2004, p.36), and Contemporary R&B, but are becoming more common in other music as well, such as by Slipknot's sample player Craig Jones.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Sampling (music)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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