Restorative justice  

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-[[Image:The Remorse of Nero by Waterhouse.jpg|thumb|200px|''[[The Remorse of the Emperor Nero after the Murder of his Mother]]'' (1878) by [[John William Waterhouse]]]] 
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 +'''Restorative justice''' (also sometimes called '''reparative justice''') is an approach to [[justice]] that focuses on the needs of the victims and the offenders, as well as the involved community, instead of satisfying abstract legal principles or punishing the offender. Victims take an active role in the process, while offenders are encouraged to take responsibility for their actions, "to repair the harm they've done—by apologizing, returning stolen money, or community service".
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 +Restorative justice involves both victim and offender and focuses on their personal needs. In addition, it provides help for the offender in order to avoid future offences. It is based on a [[theory of justice]] that considers crime and wrongdoing to be an offence against an individual or community, rather than the state.
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 +==See also==
 +* [[Bullying]]
 +* [[Conflict resolution]]
 +* [[Distributive justice]]
 +* [[International Institute for Restorative Practices]]
 +* [[Transformative justice]]
 +* [[Victimology]]
 +
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Restorative justice (also sometimes called reparative justice) is an approach to justice that focuses on the needs of the victims and the offenders, as well as the involved community, instead of satisfying abstract legal principles or punishing the offender. Victims take an active role in the process, while offenders are encouraged to take responsibility for their actions, "to repair the harm they've done—by apologizing, returning stolen money, or community service".

Restorative justice involves both victim and offender and focuses on their personal needs. In addition, it provides help for the offender in order to avoid future offences. It is based on a theory of justice that considers crime and wrongdoing to be an offence against an individual or community, rather than the state.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Restorative justice" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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