Physical law  

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Laws of nature are distinct from [[religious law|religious]] and [[law|civil]] law, and should not be confused with the concept of [[natural law]]. Laws of nature are distinct from [[religious law|religious]] and [[law|civil]] law, and should not be confused with the concept of [[natural law]].
Nor should 'physical law' be confused with 'law of [[physics]]' - the term 'physical law' usually covers laws in other sciences (e.g. biology) as well. Nor should 'physical law' be confused with 'law of [[physics]]' - the term 'physical law' usually covers laws in other sciences (e.g. biology) as well.
 +== See also ==
 +
 +* [[Cartoon physics]]
 +* [[Philosophy of science]]
 +* [[Scientific method]]
 +* [[Inductive reasoning]]
 +* [[Physical constant]]
 +* [[Laws of science]]
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A physical law or scientific law is a scientific generalization based on empirical observations of physical behavior (i.e. the law of nature). Laws of nature are observable. Scientific laws are empirical, describing the observable laws. Empirical laws are typically conclusions based on repeated scientific experiments and simple observations, over many years, and which have become accepted universally within the scientific community. The production of a summary description of our environment in the form of such laws is a fundamental aim of science.

Laws of nature are distinct from religious and civil law, and should not be confused with the concept of natural law. Nor should 'physical law' be confused with 'law of physics' - the term 'physical law' usually covers laws in other sciences (e.g. biology) as well.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Physical law" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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