Pantagruel  

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-{{Template}}Epynomous hero of the first book of [[François Rabelais]] published in [[1532]]. +{{Template}}
 +'''Pantagruel''' is the [[fictional hero]] of the first book of the [[novel sequence]] ''[[Gargantua and Pantagruel]]'' by [[François Rabelais]].
 + 
 +''Pantagruel'' is also the title of the first volume of the novel sequence, although most modern editions of Rabelais's work place ''[[Pantagruel]]'' as the second volume of a series. It was published around [[1532]] under the pen name ''[[Alcofribas Nasier]]'', an anagram of ''François Rabelais''. ''Pantagruel'' was a sequel to an anonymous book entitled ''[[Les Grandes Chroniques du Grand et Enorme Géant Gargantua]].'' This early ''[[Gargantua]]'' text enjoyed great popularity, despite its rather poor construction. Rabelais's giants are not described as being of any fixed height, as in the first two books of [[Gulliver's Travels]], but vary in size from chapter to chapter to enable a series of astonishing images as though these were tall tales. For example, in one chapter Pantagruel is able to fit into a courtroom to argue a case but in another the narrator resides inside Pantagruel's mouth for 6 months and discovers an entire nation living around his teeth.
 +==See also==
 +*[[Gargantua]]
 +*[[Pantagruelism]]
 +*[[Ponocrates]]
 +*[[John Friar]]
 + 
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Pantagruel is the fictional hero of the first book of the novel sequence Gargantua and Pantagruel by François Rabelais.

Pantagruel is also the title of the first volume of the novel sequence, although most modern editions of Rabelais's work place Pantagruel as the second volume of a series. It was published around 1532 under the pen name Alcofribas Nasier, an anagram of François Rabelais. Pantagruel was a sequel to an anonymous book entitled Les Grandes Chroniques du Grand et Enorme Géant Gargantua. This early Gargantua text enjoyed great popularity, despite its rather poor construction. Rabelais's giants are not described as being of any fixed height, as in the first two books of Gulliver's Travels, but vary in size from chapter to chapter to enable a series of astonishing images as though these were tall tales. For example, in one chapter Pantagruel is able to fit into a courtroom to argue a case but in another the narrator resides inside Pantagruel's mouth for 6 months and discovers an entire nation living around his teeth.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Pantagruel" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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