Moral lesson  

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:''[[moral nihilism]], [[Lessons for Children]]'' :''[[moral nihilism]], [[Lessons for Children]]''
In its original sense "[[fable]]" denotes a [[brief]], [[succinct]] [[story]] that is meant to [[impart]] a [[moral lesson]]. In its original sense "[[fable]]" denotes a [[brief]], [[succinct]] [[story]] that is meant to [[impart]] a [[moral lesson]].
-{{GFDL}}+ 
 +A '''[[fable]]''' is a brief, [[succinct]] [[story]], in prose or verse, that features [[animal]]s, [[plant]]s, [[inanimate|inanimate objects]], or [[nature|forces of nature]] which are [[anthropomorphized]] (given [[human]] qualities), and that illustrates a [[moral lesson]] (a "moral"), which may at the end be expressed [[explicit]]ly in a [[pithy]] [[maxim (saying)|maxim]]. {{GFDL}}

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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
moral nihilism, Lessons for Children

In its original sense "fable" denotes a brief, succinct story that is meant to impart a moral lesson.

A fable is a brief, succinct story, in prose or verse, that features animals, plants, inanimate objects, or forces of nature which are anthropomorphized (given human qualities), and that illustrates a moral lesson (a "moral"), which may at the end be expressed explicitly in a pithy maxim.



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