Married philosopher  

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-:the philosopher shudders mortally at [[marriage]], together with all that could persuade him to it—marriage as a fatal hindrance on the way to the optimum. Up to the present what great philosophers have been married? [[Heracleitus]], [[Plato]], [[Descartes]], [[Spinoza]], [[Leibnitz]], [[Kant]], [[Schopenhauer]]—they were not married, and, further, one cannot imagine them as married. A [[married philosopher]] belongs to comedy, that is my rule; as for that exception of a Socrates—the malicious Socrates married himself, it seems, ironice, just to prove this very rule. Every philosopher would say, as Buddha said, when the birth of a son was announced to him: "Rahoula has been born to me, a fetter has been forged for me" (Rahoula means here "a little demon"); there must come an hour of reflection to every "free spirit" (granted that he has had previously an hour of thoughtlessness), just as one came once to the same Buddha: "Narrowly cramped," he reflected, "is life in the house; it is a place of uncleanness; freedom is found in leaving the house." Because he thought like this, he left the house. So many bridges to independence are shown in the ascetic ideal, that the philosopher cannot refrain from exultation and clapping of hands when he hears the history of all those resolute ones, who on one day uttered a nay to all servitude and went into some desert; even granting that they were only strong asses, and the absolute opposite of strong minds. What, then, does the ascetic ideal mean in a philosopher? This is my answer—it will have been guessed long ago: when he sees this ideal the philosopher smiles because he sees therein an optimum of the conditions of the highest and boldest intellectuality; he does not thereby deny '"existence," he rather affirms thereby his existence and only his existence, and this perhaps to the point of not being far off the blasphemous wish, pereat mundus, fiat philosophia, fiat philosophus, fiam![2] . . .+:the [[philosopher]] shudders mortally at [[marriage]], together with all that could persuade him to it—marriage as a fatal hindrance on the way to the optimum. Up to the present what great philosophers have been married? [[Heracleitus]], [[Plato]], [[Descartes]], [[Spinoza]], [[Leibnitz]], [[Kant]], [[Schopenhauer]]—they were not married, and, further, one cannot imagine them as married. A [[married philosopher]] belongs to comedy, that is my rule; as for that exception of a [[Socrates]]—the malicious Socrates married himself [to [[Xanthippe]]], it seems, ironice, just to prove this very rule. --[[The Genealogy of Morals by Friedrich Nietzsche, translated by Horace B. Samuel (full text)|The Genealogy of Morals]] by [[Friedrich Nietzsche]].
 +==See also==
 +*[[Dead philosopher]]
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
the philosopher shudders mortally at marriage, together with all that could persuade him to it—marriage as a fatal hindrance on the way to the optimum. Up to the present what great philosophers have been married? Heracleitus, Plato, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibnitz, Kant, Schopenhauer—they were not married, and, further, one cannot imagine them as married. A married philosopher belongs to comedy, that is my rule; as for that exception of a Socrates—the malicious Socrates married himself [to Xanthippe], it seems, ironice, just to prove this very rule. --The Genealogy of Morals by Friedrich Nietzsche.

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