Margaret Thatcher  

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 +"If it was true that [[Margaret Thatcher]] carried about with her for a time a copy of Hayek’s magnum opus, ''[[The Constitution of Liberty]]'' (1960), she cannot have read its postscript, “[[Why I Am Not a Conservative |Why I am not a Conservative]]”, in which Hayek explains that he rejects conservatism because it lacks a vision of human progress. A case can be made that Thatcher was no conservative, either – at least if being conservative includes an aversion to policies that impose deep changes on inherited social institutions. But this is a view that goes only so far. Unlike Hayek, Thatcher understood and accepted the political limits of market economics." --[[John Gray (philosopher)|John Gray]], [http://www.newstatesman.com/politics/2015/07/john-gray-friedrich-hayek-i-knew-and-what-he-got-right-and-wrong "The Friedrich Hayek I knew, and what he got right - and wrong"] (30 July 2015)
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The Great Global Warming Swindle (2007) asserts that the view that global warming is man-made was promoted by the British Conservative Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher as a means of promoting nuclear power and reducing the impact of strike action in the state-owned coal industry by the National Union of Mineworkers.


"There is no society"


"If it was true that Margaret Thatcher carried about with her for a time a copy of Hayek’s magnum opus, The Constitution of Liberty (1960), she cannot have read its postscript, “Why I am not a Conservative”, in which Hayek explains that he rejects conservatism because it lacks a vision of human progress. A case can be made that Thatcher was no conservative, either – at least if being conservative includes an aversion to policies that impose deep changes on inherited social institutions. But this is a view that goes only so far. Unlike Hayek, Thatcher understood and accepted the political limits of market economics." --John Gray, "The Friedrich Hayek I knew, and what he got right - and wrong" (30 July 2015)

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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel

Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher (née Roberts (13 October 1925 – 8 April 2013), was a British politician, the longest-serving (1979–1990) Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of the 20th century, and the only woman to have held the post. A Soviet journalist called her the "Iron Lady", a nickname which became associated with her uncompromising politics and leadership style. As Prime Minister, she implemented Conservative policies that have come to be known as Thatcherism.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Margaret Thatcher" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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