La Arcadia  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
Revision as of 22:12, 12 January 2010
Jahsonic (Talk | contribs)

← Previous diff
Current revision
Jahsonic (Talk | contribs)

Line 1: Line 1:
{{Template}} {{Template}}
-:''[[history of the novel]]'' +:''[[pastoral romance]]; [[17th century literature]]''
-== Individual Novels Discussed ==+''[[La Arcadia]]'', ([[Italian language|Italian]], [[1504]]) is a [[pastoral novel]] by [[Jacopo Sannazaro]].
-:''[[earliest, extant novels]], [[ancient Greek novel]]''+This humanist classic is considered a masterwork that illustrated the possibilities of poetical prose in Italian, and instituted the theme of [[Arcadia (utopia)|Arcadia]], representing an idyllic land, in [[European literature]]. Sannazaro's elegant style was the inspiration for much [[courtly literature]] of the 16th century, including [[Sir Philip Sydney]]'s ''[[Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia]]''.
-From [[Western antiquity]]—Greece and Rome—these are the earliest, extant novels:+
-*[[Xenophon]], ''[[Cyropaedia (Xenophon)|The Education of Cyrus]]'' ([[Greek language|Greek]], [[4th century BC]]). A largely fictional account of the education of King [[Cyrus the Great]] of Persia. This is considered a precursor to the novel.+
-*[[Petronius Arbiter|Petronius]], ''[[Satyricon]]'' ([[Latin]], [[1st century]]).+
-*[[Apuleius]], ''[[The Golden Ass]]'' ([[Latin]], [[2nd century]]). +
-*[[Chariton]], ''[[The Loves of Chaereas and Callirhoe]]'' ([[Greek language|Greek]], [[1st century]]–[[2nd century]]).+
-*[[Achilles Tatius]], ''[[Leucippe and Clitophon]]'' ([[Greek language|Greek]], [[2nd century]]).+
-*[[Longus]], ''[[Daphnis and Chloe]]'' ([[Greek language|Greek]], [[2nd century]]).+
-*[[Xenophon of Ephesus]], ''[[Ephesian Tale]]'' ([[Greek language|Greek]], [[2nd century]]–[[3rd century]]).+
-*[[Heliodorus of Emesa|Heliodorus]], ''[[Ethiopian Tale]]'' ([[Greek language|Greek]], [[3rd century]]–[[4th century]]).+
-*Anon, ''[[Acts of Xanthippe, Polyxena, and Rebecca]]'' ([[Greek language|Greek]], [[3rd century]]–[[4th century]]).+
-*Anon, ''[[Joseph and Aseneth]]'' ([[Greek language|Greek]], [[1st century]]–[[5th century]]).+
-*Anon, ''[[Apollonius King of Tyre|The Story of Apollonius, King of Tyre]]'' ([[Latin]] adaptation of lost [[Greek language|Greek]] original, [[5th century]]–[[6th century]]).+
-===Asian works===+Sannazaro's ''[[La Arcadia]]'' - coupled with the Spanish author [[Jorge de Montemayor]]'s ''[[La Diana]]'' (1559), itself indebted to Sannazaro's work - had a profound impact on literature throughout Europe up until the middle of the [[seventeenth century]].
-:''[[Asian novel]]''+
-Early important Asian novels include:+
-*[[Dandin]], ''[[The Adventures of the Ten Princes]]'' ([[Sanskrit]], [[6th century]]–[[7th century]]).+
-*[[Banabhatta]], ''[[Kadambari]]'' ([[Sanskrit]], [[7th century]]).+
-*Anon, ''[[The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter]]'' ([[Japanese language|Japanese]], [[10th century]]).+
-*[[Murasaki Shikibu]], ''[[The Tale of Genji]]'' ([[Japanese language|Japanese]], [[11th century]]). Arguably the first novel, in the sense of a continued fictional narrative written by one author.+
-*[[Luo Guanzhong]], ''[[Romance of the Three Kingdoms]]'' ([[Chinese language|Chinese]], [[14th century]]).+
-*[[Shi Nai'an]] and [[Luo Guanzhong]], ''[[Water Margin]]'' ([[Chinese language|Chinese]], [[15th century]]).+
-*[[Wu Cheng'en]], ''[[Journey to the West]]'' ([[Chinese language|Chinese]], [[16th century]]).+
-*[[Cao Xueqin]], ''[[Dream of the Red Chamber]]'' ([[Chinese language|Chinese]], [[18th Century]]).+
-=== The 13th century ===+The ''Arcadia'' of Sannazaro was written in the 1480s and circulated in manuscript before its initial publication. Begun in early life and published in [[Naples]] in 1504, the ''Arcadia'' is a [[Romance (genre)|pastoral Romance]], in which Sincero, the ''persona'' of the poet, disappointed in love, withdraws from the city (Naples in this case) to pursue in [[Arcadia (utopia)|Arcadia]] an idealized pastoral existence among the shepherd-poets, in the manner of the Idylls of [[Theocritus]]. But a frightful dream induces him to return to the city, traversing a dark tunnel to his native Naples, where he learns of the death of his beloved. The events are amplified by extensive imagery drawn from classic sources, by the poet's languid melancholy and by atmospheric elegiac descriptions of the lost world of Arcadia. It was the first ''[[pastoral]]'' work in [[Renaissance]] Europe to gain international success. Inspired in part by classical authors who wrote in the pastoral mode— in addition to [[Virgil]] and [[Theocritus]] including comparatively obscure recently rediscovered Latin poets [[Calpurnius]] and [[Nemesianus]]— and by [[Giovanni Boccaccio|Boccaccio]]'s ''Ameto'', Sannazaro depicts a lovelorn first-person narrator ("Sincero") wandering the countryside ([[Arcadia]]) and listening to the amorous or mournful songs of the shepherds he meets. In addition to its pastoral setting, the other great originality of the work stems from its novel structure of alternating prose and verse.
-:''[[13th century literature]]''+
-*[[Ramon Llull]], ''[[Blanquerna]]'' ([[1283]])+
-=== The 14th century === 
-:''[[15th century literature]]'' 
-* [[Giovanni Boccaccio]], ''[[Decameron]]'' ([[1353]]) 
-* [[Geoffrey Chaucer]], ''[[Canterbury Tales]]'' ([[1386]]-[[1400]]) 
-=== The 15th century ===+{{GFDL}}
-:''[[15th century literature]]'' 
-*[[Antoine de la Sale]], ''[[Petit Jehan de Saintré]]'' ([[1456]]) 
-*[[Thomas Malory]], ''[[Le Morte d'Arthur]]'', ([[English language|English]], [[1485]]). 
-*[[Joanot Martorell]], ''[[Tirant lo Blanc]]'' ([[Catalan language|Catalan]], [[1490]]), chivalric romance. 
-=== The 16th century === 
- 
-:''[[16th century literature]]'' 
-*[[Jacopo Sannazaro]], ''[[La Arcadia]]'', ([[Italian language|Italian]], [[1504]]), pastoral novel.  
-*[[Garci Rodríguez de Montalvo]], ''[[Amadis de Gaula]]'' ([[Spanish language|Spanish]] adaptation of lost [[13th century]] original, [[1508]]). 
-*[[Thomas More]], ''[[Utopia (Novel)|Utopia]]'' ([[Latin]], circa [[1516]]). 
-*[[François Rabelais]], ''[[Pantagruel]]'', ([[French language|French]], [[1532]]). 
-*[[Jorge de Montemayor]], ''[[La Diana]]'' ([[Spanish language|Spanish]], [[1559]]), pastoral novel.  
-*Anon, ''[[Lazarillo de Tormes]]'' ([[Spanish language|Spanish]], [[1554]]). 
-*[[Mateo Aleman|Mateo Alemán]], ''[[Guzmán de Alfarache]]'' ([[Spanish language|Spanish]], [[1599]]). 
- 
-=== The 17th century === 
-:''[[17th century literature]]'' 
-*[[Miguel de Cervantes]], ''[[Don Quixote]] de la Mancha'' ([[1605]]). 
-*[[Miguel de Cervantes]], ''[[Novelas Exemplares]]'' ([[1613]]). 
-*[[Francisco de Quevedo]], ''[[El buscón]]'' ([[Spanish language|Spanish]], [[1626]]), masterpiece of the picaresque subgenre.  
-*[[Hans Jakob Christoffel von Grimmelshausen]], ''[[Simplicissimus]]'' ([[German language|German]], [[1668]]/[[1669]]), the [[Thirty Years War]] put into satirical autobiography. 
-*[[Aphra Behn]], [[Love-Letters between a Nobleman and his Sister]] ([[United Kingdom|British]], [[1684]]/[[1685]]/[[1687]]), the first full blown epistolary novel. 
-*[[Aphra Behn]], ''[[Oroonoko]]'', ([[United Kingdom|British]], [[1688]]). 
- 
-=== The 18th century === 
- 
-:''[[18th century literature]]'' 
-*[[Eliza Haywood]], ''[[Love in Excess]]'', ([[United Kingdom|British]], [[1719]]) 
-*[[Daniel Defoe]], ''[[Robinson Crusoe]]'', ([[United Kingdom|British]], [[1719]]) 
-*[[Samuel Richardson]], ''[[Pamela]]'', ([[United Kingdom|British]], [[1740]]) 
-*[[Henry Fielding]], ''[[The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling|Tom Jones]]'', ([[United Kingdom|British]], [[1749]]) 
-*[[Laurence Sterne]], ''[[Tristram Shandy]]'', ([[United Kingdom|British]], [[1759]]-[[1767]]) 
-*[[Tobias Smollett]], ''[[The Expedition of Humphrey Clinker]]'', ([[Scotland|Scottish]], [[1771]]) 
-*[[Ignacy Krasicki]], ''[[The Adventures of Nicholas Experience]]'' (the first [[Poland|Polish]] novel, [[1776]]). 
-*[[Frances Burney]], ''[[Evelina]]'', ([[United Kingdom|British]], [[1778]]) 
-*[[Ann Radcliffe]], ''[[The Mysteries of Udolpho]]'', ([[United Kingdom|British]], [[1794]]) 
-*[[Mary Hays]], ''[[Memoirs of Emma Courtney]]'', ([[United Kingdom|British]], [[1796]]) 
- 
-=== The 19th century === 
-:''[[19th century literature]]'' 
-*[[Jane Austen]], ''[[Pride and Prejudice]]'' ([[United Kingdom|British]], [[1811]]). 
-*[[Aleksandr Pushkin]], ''[[Eugene Onegin]]'' ([[Russian language|Russian]]), [[1825]]-[[1831]]. 
-*[[Stendhal]], ''[[The Red and the Black]]'' ([[French language|French]], [[1831]]). 
-*[[Honoré de Balzac]], ''[[Le père Goriot|Père Goriot]]'' (Old Goriot; [[French language|French]], [[1835]]). 
-*[[Stendhal]], ''[[The Charterhouse of Parma]]'' ([[French language|French]], [[1839]]). 
-*[[Mikhail Lermontov]], ''[[A Hero of Our Time]]'' ([[Russian language|Russian]]), [[1839]]. 
-*[[Alessandro Manzoni]], ''[[The Betrothed]]'' ([[Italian language|Italian]], [[1840]]). 
-*[[Emily Brontë]], ''[[Wuthering Heights]]'' ([[United Kingdom|British]], [[1847]]). 
-*[[Charlotte Brontë]], ''[[Jane Eyre]]'' ([[United Kingdom|British]], [[1847]]). 
-*[[Herman Melville]], ''[[Moby-Dick]]'' ([[American language|American]], [[1851]]). 
-*[[Anthony Trollope]], ''[[Barchester Towers]]'' ([[United Kingdom|British]], [[1857]]).  
-*[[Gustave Flaubert]], ''[[Madame Bovary]]'' ([[French language|French]],[[1857]]). 
-*[[Ivan Goncharov]], ''[[Oblomov]]'' ([[Russian language|Russian]]), [[1859]]. 
-*[[Charles Dickens]], ''[[Great Expectations]]'' ([[United Kingdom|British]], [[1860]]-[[1861]]). 
-*[[Ivan Turgenev]], ''[[Fathers and Sons]]'' ([[Russian language|Russian]]), [[1861]]. 
-*[[Victor Hugo]], ''[[Les Misérables]]'' ([[French language|French]], [[1862]]). 
-*[[Leo Tolstoy]], ''[[War and Peace]]'' ([[Russian language|Russian]], [[1865]]). 
-*[[Fyodor Dostoyevsky]], ''[[Crime and Punishment]]'' ([[Russian language|Russian]], [[1866]]). 
-*[[George Eliot]], ''[[Middlemarch]]'' ([[United Kingdom|British]], [[1871]]). 
-*[[Leo Tolstoy]], ''[[Anna Karenina]]'' ([[Russian language|Russian]]), ([[1875]]-[[1877]]). 
-*[[Józef Ignacy Kraszewski]], ''[[An Ancient Tale]]'' ([[Polish language|Polish]], [[1876]]). 
-*[[Fyodor Dostoyevsky]], ''[[The Brothers Karamazov]]'' ([[Russian language|Russian]]), [[1880]]). 
-*[[Mark Twain]], ''[[The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn]]'' ([[American language|American]], [[1885]]). 
-*[[Gabriela Zapolska]], ''[[Cathy the Caryatid]]'' ([[Polish language|Polish]], [[1885]] – [[1886]]). 
-*[[Benito Pérez Galdós]], ''[[Fortunata y Jacinta]]'' ([[Spanish language|Spanish]], [[1886]]-[[1887]]). 
-*[[Wilhelm Raabe]], ''[[Stopfkuchen]]'', [[1891]] 
-*[[Henryk Sienkiewicz]], ''[[Quo Vadis (novel)|Quo Vadis]]'' ([[Polish language|Polish]], [[1895]]). 
-*[[Boleslaw Prus|Bolesław Prus]], ''[[Faraon|Pharaoh]]'' ([[Polish language|Polish]], [[1895]]). 
-*[[Joseph Conrad]], ''[[The Nigger of the 'Narcissus']]'' ([[Polish language|Polish]], [[1897]]). 
-*[[Theodor Fontane]], ''[[Der Stechlin]]'', [[1899]] 
- 
-=== The 20th century === 
-:''[[20th century literature]]'' 
-*[[Stefan Zeromski|Stefan Żeromski]]: ''[[Ashes]]'' ([[Polish language|Polish]], [[1902]] – [[1903]]) 
-*[[Wladyslaw Reymont|Władysław Reymont]]: ''[[The Peasants]]'' ([[Polish language|Polish]], [[1902]] – [[1909]]). 
-*[[Gabriela Zapolska]], ''[[Seasonal Love]]'' ([[Polish language|Polish]], [[1904]]). 
-*[[Marcel Proust]] ''[[In Search Of Lost Time]]'' ([[French language|French]], [[1913]]-[[1927]]).  
-*[[James Joyce]] ''[[Ulysses (novel)|Ulysses]]'' ([[Hiberno-English|Irish]], [[1922 in literature|1922]]). 
-*[[Thomas Mann]] ''[[The Magic Mountain]]'' ([[German language|German]], [[1924]]). 
-*[[Franz Kafka]] ''[[The Trial]]'' ([[German language|German]], [[1925]]).  
-*[[Betty Smith]] ''[[A Tree Grows In Brooklyn]]'' ([[United States|American]], [[1943]]). 
-*[[Virginia Woolf]] ''[[To the Lighthouse]]'' ([[United Kingdom|British]], [[1927]]).  
-*[[Robert Musil]] ''[[The Man Without Qualities]]'' ([[German language|Austrian]], [[1930]]-[[1942]]). 
-*[[William Faulkner]] ''[[As I Lay Dying]]'' ([[English language|American]], 1930). 
-*[[Stanislaw Ignacy Witkiewicz|Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz]], ''[[Insatiability]]'' ([[Polish language|Polish]], [[1930]]). 
-*[[Tadeusz Dolega-Mostowicz|Tadeusz Dołęga-Mostowicz]], ''[[The Career of Nicodemus Dyzma]]'' ([[Polish language|Polish]], [[1932]]). 
-*[[Witold Gombrowicz]], ''[[Ferdydurke]]'' ([[Polish language|Polish]], [[1937]]).  
-*[[Vaikom Muhammad Basheer]], ''[[Baalyakaalasakhi]]'' ([[Malayalam language| Malayalam]], [[1944]]) 
-The 20th century also saw the emergence of many notable novelists of non-European and non-U.S. backgrounds. The years [[1960]] – [[1967]], in particular, witnessed the [[Latin America novel boom]]: 
-*[[Mario Vargas Llosa]], ''[[La ciudad y los perros]]'' ([[Spanish language|Spanish]], [[1963]]). 
-*[[Gabriel García Márquez]], ''[[Cien años de soledad]]'' ([[Spanish language|Spanish]]). 
-*[[Isabel Allende]], ''[[The House of the Spirits]]'' (1982)  
- 
-The most notable [[African American]] novelists have included: 
-*[[Zora Neale Hurston]], ''[[Their Eyes Were Watching God]]'' (1937)  
-*[[Ralph Ellison]], ''[[Invisible Man]]'' ([[1952]]) 
-*[[James Baldwin (writer)|James Baldwin]], ''[[Another Country (novel)|Another Country]]'' ([[1962]]) 
-*[[Toni Morrison]], ''[[Beloved (novel)|Beloved]]'' (1987) 
- 
-[[Modernism]] continued into the late 20th century, sometimes becoming [[postmodernism]]; Toni Morrison (above) is part of that tradition: 
- 
-* [[Vladimir Nabokov]], ''[[Lolita]]'' (1955) 
-* [[Thomas Pynchon]], ''[[Gravity's Rainbow]]'' (1973) 
-* [[Salman Rushdie]], ''[[Midnight's Children]]'' (1980)  
-* [[Milan Kundera]], ''[[The Unbearable Lightness of Being]]'' (1984) 
- 
-Other novelists ignored or reacted against [[modernism]]: 
- 
-* [[John Updike]], the ''Rabbit'' tetralogy (1959–1990) 
{{GFDL}} {{GFDL}}

Current revision

Related e

Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Shop


Featured:

pastoral romance; 17th century literature

La Arcadia, (Italian, 1504) is a pastoral novel by Jacopo Sannazaro.

This humanist classic is considered a masterwork that illustrated the possibilities of poetical prose in Italian, and instituted the theme of Arcadia, representing an idyllic land, in European literature. Sannazaro's elegant style was the inspiration for much courtly literature of the 16th century, including Sir Philip Sydney's Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia.

Sannazaro's La Arcadia - coupled with the Spanish author Jorge de Montemayor's La Diana (1559), itself indebted to Sannazaro's work - had a profound impact on literature throughout Europe up until the middle of the seventeenth century.

The Arcadia of Sannazaro was written in the 1480s and circulated in manuscript before its initial publication. Begun in early life and published in Naples in 1504, the Arcadia is a pastoral Romance, in which Sincero, the persona of the poet, disappointed in love, withdraws from the city (Naples in this case) to pursue in Arcadia an idealized pastoral existence among the shepherd-poets, in the manner of the Idylls of Theocritus. But a frightful dream induces him to return to the city, traversing a dark tunnel to his native Naples, where he learns of the death of his beloved. The events are amplified by extensive imagery drawn from classic sources, by the poet's languid melancholy and by atmospheric elegiac descriptions of the lost world of Arcadia. It was the first pastoral work in Renaissance Europe to gain international success. Inspired in part by classical authors who wrote in the pastoral mode— in addition to Virgil and Theocritus including comparatively obscure recently rediscovered Latin poets Calpurnius and Nemesianus— and by Boccaccio's Ameto, Sannazaro depicts a lovelorn first-person narrator ("Sincero") wandering the countryside (Arcadia) and listening to the amorous or mournful songs of the shepherds he meets. In addition to its pastoral setting, the other great originality of the work stems from its novel structure of alternating prose and verse.





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "La Arcadia" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "La Arcadia" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools