Jean Ray (author)  

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-[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/{{PAGENAMEE}}] [May 2007]+'''Jean Ray''' is the best-known [[pseudonym]] among the many used by '''Raymundus Joannes de Kremer''' ([[8 July]] [[1887]]-[[17 September]] [[1964]]), a prolific [[Belgium|Belgian]] [[French language]] writer. Although he wrote straight [[journalism]], stories for young readers in [[Dutch language|Dutch]] under the name '''John Flanders''', scenarios for [[comic strips]] and [[detective stories]], he is best known for his tales of the [[fantastique]] written under the name Jean Ray. In the English-speaking world, he is famous for his macabre novel ''[[Malpertuis]]'' (1943), which was filmed by [[Harry Kümel]] in 1971 (starring [[Orson Welles]]). He also used the pseudonyms King Ray, Alix R. Bantam and Sailor John, among others.[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/{{PAGENAMEE}}] [May 2007]

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Jean Ray is the best-known pseudonym among the many used by Raymundus Joannes de Kremer (8 July 1887-17 September 1964), a prolific Belgian French language writer. Although he wrote straight journalism, stories for young readers in Dutch under the name John Flanders, scenarios for comic strips and detective stories, he is best known for his tales of the fantastique written under the name Jean Ray. In the English-speaking world, he is famous for his macabre novel Malpertuis (1943), which was filmed by Harry Kümel in 1971 (starring Orson Welles). He also used the pseudonyms King Ray, Alix R. Bantam and Sailor John, among others.[1] [May 2007]

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