Inductive reasoning  

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 +"[[Contemporary science]] is founded upon the principle of [[inductive reasoning|induction]]: most people have seen a certain phenomenon precede or follow some other phenomenon most often, and conclude therefrom that it will ever be thus." --''[[Exploits and Opinions of Dr. Faustroll, Pataphysician ]]'' (1911) by [[Alfred Jarry]]
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'''Inductive reasoning''' is the process of making [[inference]]s based upon observed [[pattern]]s, or simple [[repetition]]. Often used in reference to [[prediction]]s about ''will happen'' or ''does happen,'' based upon what ''has happened.'' '''Inductive reasoning''' is the process of making [[inference]]s based upon observed [[pattern]]s, or simple [[repetition]]. Often used in reference to [[prediction]]s about ''will happen'' or ''does happen,'' based upon what ''has happened.''

Revision as of 23:51, 23 November 2018

"Contemporary science is founded upon the principle of induction: most people have seen a certain phenomenon precede or follow some other phenomenon most often, and conclude therefrom that it will ever be thus." --Exploits and Opinions of Dr. Faustroll, Pataphysician (1911) by Alfred Jarry

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Inductive reasoning is the process of making inferences based upon observed patterns, or simple repetition. Often used in reference to predictions about will happen or does happen, based upon what has happened.

The problem of induction is one of considerable debate and importance in the philosophy of science: is induction indeed justified, and if so, how?

It is used to ascribe properties or relations to types based on an observation instance (i.e., on a number of observations or experiences); or to formulate laws based on limited observations of recurring phenomenal patterns. Induction is employed, for example, in using specific propositions such as:

This ice is cold. (or: All ice I have ever touched was cold.)
This billiard ball moves when struck with a cue. (or: 100/100 billiard balls struck with a cue moved.)

...to infer general propositions such as:

All ice is cold.
All billiard balls move when struck with a cue.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Inductive reasoning" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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