Ginger Baker  

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 +"When I started listening to [[Cream (band)|Cream]] and stuff, I started to read interviews with people like [[Ginger Baker|Ginger [Baker]]] about where they were getting their stuff from. Just like [[Eric Clapton|Clapton]] was getting ideas from blues guys, I realized that rhythm musicians were getting a lot of information from Africa. I immediately started looking for the records, especially [[Afrobeat]]. Just that [[syncopation]], the up feel." --[[Bill Laswell]] interviewed by Jay Babcock in [[Mean Magazine]] (October 1999)
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{{Template}} {{Template}}
-'''Peter Edward''' "'''Ginger'''" '''Baker''' (19 August 1939 – 6 October 2019) was an [[English drummer]] and a co-founder of the rock band [[Cream (band)|Cream]]. His work in the 1960s and 1970s earned him the reputation of "rock's first superstar drummer", for a style that melded [[jazz]] and [[Music of Africa|African rhythms]] and pioneered both [[jazz fusion]] and [[world music]].+'''Peter Edward''' "'''Ginger'''" '''Baker''' (19 August 1939 – 6 October 2019) was an [[English drummer]] and a co-founder of the rock band [[Cream (band)|Cream]]. His style melded [[jazz]] and [[Music of Africa|African rhythms]] and pioneered both [[jazz fusion]] and [[world music]].
-He played [[Live! (Fela Kuti album)|with Fela Kuti]] and ''[[Horses & Trees]]''+Baker cited [[Phil Seamen]], [[Art Blakey]], [[Max Roach]], [[Elvin Jones]], [[Philly Joe Jones]] and [[Baby Dodds]] as main influences on his style.
 + 
 +Known for playing on compositions as "[[Sunshine of Your Love]]" (1967), he also played with [[Fela Kuti]] on ''[[Fela's London Scene]]'' ( 1971), ''[[Why Black Man Dey Suffer]]'' (1971), ''[[Live! (Fela Kuti album)|Live!]]'' (1972) and ''[[Stratavarious]]'' (1972) and recorded two album with [[Bill Laswell]]: ''[[Horses & Trees]]'' (1986) and ''[[Middle Passage]]'' (1990).
==Overview== ==Overview==
Baker began playing drums at age 15, and later took lessons from English jazz drummer [[Phil Seamen]]. In the 1960s he joined [[Blues Incorporated]], where he met bassist [[Jack Bruce]]. The two clashed often, but would be rhythm section partners again in [[the Graham Bond Organisation]] and Cream, the latter of which Baker co-founded with [[Eric Clapton]] in 1966. Cream achieved worldwide success but lasted only until 1968, in part due to Baker's and Bruce's volatile relationship. After briefly working with Clapton in [[Blind Faith]] and leading [[Ginger Baker's Air Force]], Baker spent several years in the 1970s living and recording in Africa, often with [[Fela Kuti]], in pursuit of his long-time interest in African music. Among Baker's other collaborations are his work with [[Gary Moore]], [[Masters of Reality]], [[Public Image Ltd]], [[Hawkwind]], [[Atomic Rooster]], [[Bill Laswell]], jazz bassist [[Charlie Haden]], jazz guitarist [[Bill Frisell]] and Ginger Baker's Energy. Baker began playing drums at age 15, and later took lessons from English jazz drummer [[Phil Seamen]]. In the 1960s he joined [[Blues Incorporated]], where he met bassist [[Jack Bruce]]. The two clashed often, but would be rhythm section partners again in [[the Graham Bond Organisation]] and Cream, the latter of which Baker co-founded with [[Eric Clapton]] in 1966. Cream achieved worldwide success but lasted only until 1968, in part due to Baker's and Bruce's volatile relationship. After briefly working with Clapton in [[Blind Faith]] and leading [[Ginger Baker's Air Force]], Baker spent several years in the 1970s living and recording in Africa, often with [[Fela Kuti]], in pursuit of his long-time interest in African music. Among Baker's other collaborations are his work with [[Gary Moore]], [[Masters of Reality]], [[Public Image Ltd]], [[Hawkwind]], [[Atomic Rooster]], [[Bill Laswell]], jazz bassist [[Charlie Haden]], jazz guitarist [[Bill Frisell]] and Ginger Baker's Energy.
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* ''[[Horses & Trees]]'' (Celluloid, 1986) * ''[[Horses & Trees]]'' (Celluloid, 1986)
* ''No Material'' (ITM, 1989) * ''No Material'' (ITM, 1989)
-* ''Middle Passage'' (Axiom, 1990)+* ''[[Middle Passage]]'' ([[Axiom]], 1990)
* ''Unseen Rain'' (Day Eight, 1992) * ''Unseen Rain'' (Day Eight, 1992)
* ''Ginger Baker's Energy'' (ITM, 1992) * ''Ginger Baker's Energy'' (ITM, 1992)

Current revision

"When I started listening to Cream and stuff, I started to read interviews with people like Ginger [Baker] about where they were getting their stuff from. Just like Clapton was getting ideas from blues guys, I realized that rhythm musicians were getting a lot of information from Africa. I immediately started looking for the records, especially Afrobeat. Just that syncopation, the up feel." --Bill Laswell interviewed by Jay Babcock in Mean Magazine (October 1999)

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Peter Edward "Ginger" Baker (19 August 1939 – 6 October 2019) was an English drummer and a co-founder of the rock band Cream. His style melded jazz and African rhythms and pioneered both jazz fusion and world music.

Baker cited Phil Seamen, Art Blakey, Max Roach, Elvin Jones, Philly Joe Jones and Baby Dodds as main influences on his style.

Known for playing on compositions as "Sunshine of Your Love" (1967), he also played with Fela Kuti on Fela's London Scene ( 1971), Why Black Man Dey Suffer (1971), Live! (1972) and Stratavarious (1972) and recorded two album with Bill Laswell: Horses & Trees (1986) and Middle Passage (1990).

Contents

Overview

Baker began playing drums at age 15, and later took lessons from English jazz drummer Phil Seamen. In the 1960s he joined Blues Incorporated, where he met bassist Jack Bruce. The two clashed often, but would be rhythm section partners again in the Graham Bond Organisation and Cream, the latter of which Baker co-founded with Eric Clapton in 1966. Cream achieved worldwide success but lasted only until 1968, in part due to Baker's and Bruce's volatile relationship. After briefly working with Clapton in Blind Faith and leading Ginger Baker's Air Force, Baker spent several years in the 1970s living and recording in Africa, often with Fela Kuti, in pursuit of his long-time interest in African music. Among Baker's other collaborations are his work with Gary Moore, Masters of Reality, Public Image Ltd, Hawkwind, Atomic Rooster, Bill Laswell, jazz bassist Charlie Haden, jazz guitarist Bill Frisell and Ginger Baker's Energy.

Baker's drumming is regarded for its style, showmanship, and use of two bass drums instead of the conventional one. In his early days, he performed lengthy drum solos, most notably in the Cream song "Toad", one of the earliest recorded examples in rock music. Baker was an inductee of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of Cream, of the Modern Drummer Hall of Fame in 2008, and of the Classic Drummer Hall of Fame in 2016. Baker was noted for his eccentric, often self-destructive lifestyle, and he struggled with heroin addiction for many years. He was married four times and has fathered three children.

Discography

Solo

  • Ginger Baker at His Best (1972)
  • Stratavarious (Polydor, 1972)
  • Ginger Baker & Friends (Mountain, 1976)
  • Eleven Sides of Baker (Sire, 1977)
  • From Humble Oranges (CDG, 1983)
  • Horses & Trees (Celluloid, 1986)
  • No Material (ITM, 1989)
  • Middle Passage (Axiom, 1990)
  • Unseen Rain (Day Eight, 1992)
  • Ginger Baker's Energy (ITM, 1992)
  • Going Back Home (Atlantic, 1994)
  • Ginger Baker The Album (ITM, 1995)
  • Falling Off the Roof (Atlantic, 1995)
  • Do What You Like (Polydor, 1998)
  • Coward of the County (Atlantic, 1999)
  • African Force (2001)
  • African Force: Palanquin's Pole (2006)
  • Why? (2014)

Blind Faith discography

Cream discography

The Storyville Jazz Men and the Hugh Rainey Allstars

  • Storyville Re-Visited (1958) also featuring Bob Wallis and Ginger Baker

Alexis Korner Blues Incorporated

  • Alexis Korner and Friends (1963)

Graham Bond Organisation

  • Live at Klooks Kleek (1964)
  • The Sound of '65 (1965)
  • There's a Bond Between Us (1965)

Ginger Baker's Air Force discography

Baker Gurvitz Army discography

With Fela Kuti

With Hawkwind

With others




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