Faux painting  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
Revision as of 12:35, 6 October 2011
Jahsonic (Talk | contribs)

← Previous diff
Revision as of 12:38, 6 October 2011
Jahsonic (Talk | contribs)

Next diff →
Line 1: Line 1:
{{Template}} {{Template}}
-# A [[painting]] done with [[oil paint]]s.+'''Faux painting''' or '''faux finishing''' are terms used to describe a wide range of decorative painting techniques. The naming comes from the French word [[wikt:faux|faux]], meaning false, as these techniques started as a form of replicating materials such as marble and wood with paint, but has subsequently come to encompass many other decorative finishes for walls and furniture.
-# The [[art]] of painting with oil paints.+
-==History==+
-Most [[Renaissance]] sources, in particular [[Vasari]], credited northern European painters of the 15th century, and [[Jan van Eyck]] in particular, with the "invention" of painting with oil media on [[panel painting|wood panel]], however [[Theophilus Presbyter|Theophilus]] ([[Roger of Helmarshausen]]?) clearly gives instructions for oil-based painting in his treatise, On Divers Arts, written in 1125. [[Early Netherlandish painting]] in the 15th century was however the first to make oil the usual painting medium, followed by the rest of Northern Europe, and only then Italy. The popularity of oil spread through Italy from the North, starting in [[Venice]] in the late 15th century. By 1540 the previous method for painting on panel, [[tempera]] had become all but extinct, although Italians continued to use [[fresco]] for wall paintings, which was more difficult in Northern climates.+== History ==
-==See also==+Faux finishing has been used for millennia, from [[cave painting]] to the tombs of [[ancient Egypt]], but what we generally think of as faux finishing in the [[decorative art]]s began with [[plaster]] and [[stucco]] finishes in [[Mesopotamia]] over 5000 years ago. [[Image:Faux paint sample 1.jpg|thumb|250px|right|Examples of faux paintings.]]
-* ''[[The Artist's Handbook of Materials and Techniques]]'', comprehensive reference book by Ralph Mayer (1940)+ 
-* [[Faux painting]]+Faux painting became popular in classical times in the forms of faux [[marble]], faux [[wood]], and [[trompe l'oeil]] [[murals]]. Artists would apprentice for 10 years or more with a master faux painter before working on their own. Great recognition was awarded to artists who could actually trick viewers into believing their work was the real thing. Faux painting has continued to be popular throughout the ages, but experienced major resurgences in the [[Neoclassical architecture|neoclassical]] revival of the nineteenth century and the [[Art Deco]] styles of the 1920s. During the recent history of decorative painting, faux finishing has been mainly used in commercial and public spaces.
-* [[History of painting]]+ 
-* [[Lists of painters]]+In the late 1980s and early 1990s, faux finishing saw another major revival, as [[wallpaper]] began to fall out of fashion. At this point, faux painting became extremely popular in home environments, with high-end homes leading the trend. While it can be quite expensive to hire a professional faux finisher, many faux painting methods are simple enough for a beginning home owner to create with a little instruction. People are also attracted to the simplicity of changing a faux finish, as it can be easily painted over compared with the hassle of removing wallpaper.
-* [[Oil sketch]]+ 
-* [[Old Master]]+In modern day faux finishing, there are two major materials/processes used. [[Glaze (painting technique)|Glaze]] work involves using a translucent mixture of paint and glaze applied with a brush, roller, rag, or sponge, and often mimics textures, but it is always smooth to the touch. Plaster work can be done with tinted plasters, or washed over with earth pigments, and is generally applied with a trowel or spatula. The finished result can be either flat to the touch or textured.
-* [[Paper marbling]]+ 
 +== Faux finishes ==
 +* [[Marbleizing]] or faux marbling is used to make walls and furniture look like real marble. This can be done using either plaster or glaze techniques. [[Image:zebra wood.jpg|thumb|250px|right|Example of faux painting a wood design]]
 +* [[Graining]], wood graining, or faux bois (French for "fake wood") is often used to imitate exotic or hard-to-find wood varieties.
 +* [[Trompe l'oeil]], "trick the eye" in French, is a realistic painting technique often used in murals, and to create architectural details.
 +* [[Venetian plaster]] is a smooth and often shiny plaster design that appears textured but is smooth to the touch. Venetian plaster is one of the most popular and traditional plaster decorations.
 +* [[Color wash]] is a free-form finish that creates subtle variations of color using multiple hues of glaze blended together with a paint brush.
 +* [[Strié]], from the French for 'stripe' or 'streak', is a glazing technique that creates soft thin streaks of color using a paint brush. It is a technique often used to simulate fabrics such as linen and denim.
 +* [[Rag painting]] or ragging is a glazing technique using twisted or bunched up rags to create a textural pattern.
{{GFDL}} {{GFDL}}

Revision as of 12:38, 6 October 2011

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Faux painting or faux finishing are terms used to describe a wide range of decorative painting techniques. The naming comes from the French word faux, meaning false, as these techniques started as a form of replicating materials such as marble and wood with paint, but has subsequently come to encompass many other decorative finishes for walls and furniture.

History

Faux finishing has been used for millennia, from cave painting to the tombs of ancient Egypt, but what we generally think of as faux finishing in the decorative arts began with plaster and stucco finishes in Mesopotamia over 5000 years ago.
Image:Faux paint sample 1.jpg
Examples of faux paintings.

Faux painting became popular in classical times in the forms of faux marble, faux wood, and trompe l'oeil murals. Artists would apprentice for 10 years or more with a master faux painter before working on their own. Great recognition was awarded to artists who could actually trick viewers into believing their work was the real thing. Faux painting has continued to be popular throughout the ages, but experienced major resurgences in the neoclassical revival of the nineteenth century and the Art Deco styles of the 1920s. During the recent history of decorative painting, faux finishing has been mainly used in commercial and public spaces.

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, faux finishing saw another major revival, as wallpaper began to fall out of fashion. At this point, faux painting became extremely popular in home environments, with high-end homes leading the trend. While it can be quite expensive to hire a professional faux finisher, many faux painting methods are simple enough for a beginning home owner to create with a little instruction. People are also attracted to the simplicity of changing a faux finish, as it can be easily painted over compared with the hassle of removing wallpaper.

In modern day faux finishing, there are two major materials/processes used. Glaze work involves using a translucent mixture of paint and glaze applied with a brush, roller, rag, or sponge, and often mimics textures, but it is always smooth to the touch. Plaster work can be done with tinted plasters, or washed over with earth pigments, and is generally applied with a trowel or spatula. The finished result can be either flat to the touch or textured.

Faux finishes

  • Marbleizing or faux marbling is used to make walls and furniture look like real marble. This can be done using either plaster or glaze techniques.
    Image:Zebra wood.jpg
    Example of faux painting a wood design
  • Graining, wood graining, or faux bois (French for "fake wood") is often used to imitate exotic or hard-to-find wood varieties.
  • Trompe l'oeil, "trick the eye" in French, is a realistic painting technique often used in murals, and to create architectural details.
  • Venetian plaster is a smooth and often shiny plaster design that appears textured but is smooth to the touch. Venetian plaster is one of the most popular and traditional plaster decorations.
  • Color wash is a free-form finish that creates subtle variations of color using multiple hues of glaze blended together with a paint brush.
  • Strié, from the French for 'stripe' or 'streak', is a glazing technique that creates soft thin streaks of color using a paint brush. It is a technique often used to simulate fabrics such as linen and denim.
  • Rag painting or ragging is a glazing technique using twisted or bunched up rags to create a textural pattern.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Faux painting" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools