Eros  

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-{{Template}}In [[Greek mythology]], '''Eros''' ([[Greek language|Greek]]: Ἔρως) was the [[Greek primordial gods|primordial god]] of [[attraction|lust]], [[love]], and [[ intercourse]]; he was also worshipped as a [[fertility]] deity. His name is the root of words such as ''[[erotic]]''. In some myths, he was the son of the deity [[Aphrodite]]. Like [[Dionysus]], he was sometimes referred to as '''''Eleutherios''''', "the liberator". His [[Roman mythology|Roman]] equivalent was [[Cupid]], "desire", also known as Amor, "love".+[[Image:Amor Vincit Omnia by Caravaggio.jpg|thumb|right|200px|''[[Amor Vincit Omnia (Caravaggio) |Amor Vincit Omnia]]'' ([[1601]] - [[1603]]) by [[Caravaggio]]]]
 +{{Template}}
 +In [[Greek mythology]], '''Eros''' ([[Greek language|Greek]]: Ἔρως) was the [[Greek primordial gods|primordial god]] of [[attraction|lust]], [[love]], and [[ intercourse]]; he was also worshipped as a [[fertility]] deity. His name is the root of words such as ''[[erotic]]''. In some myths, he was the son of the deity [[Aphrodite]]. Like [[Dionysus]], he was sometimes referred to as '''''Eleutherios''''', "the liberator". His [[Roman mythology|Roman]] equivalent was [[Cupid]], "desire", also known as Amor, "love".
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

In Greek mythology, Eros (Greek: Ἔρως) was the primordial god of lust, love, and intercourse; he was also worshipped as a fertility deity. His name is the root of words such as erotic. In some myths, he was the son of the deity Aphrodite. Like Dionysus, he was sometimes referred to as Eleutherios, "the liberator". His Roman equivalent was Cupid, "desire", also known as Amor, "love".



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Eros" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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