Erebus  

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-In [[Greek mythology]], '''Erebus''' ({{IPA|ˈer.e.bus}}) or '''Erebos''' or '''Erebes''' ([[Ancient Greek language|Ancient Greek]]: {{polytonic|Ἔρεβος}}; [[English language|English]] translation: "deep blackness/darkness or shadow") was the son of a primordial god, [[Chaos (mythology)|Khaos]], and represented the personification of darkness and shadow, which filled in all the corners and crannies of the world. His name is used interchangeably with Tartarus and Hades since Erebus is often thought of as part of the underworld. Erebus married his sister [[Nyx]] (goddess of the night) and their children included [[Aether (mythology)|Aether]], [[Hemera]], [[Nemesis (mythology)|Nemesis]], and [[Charon (mythology)|Charon]].+In [[Greek mythology]], '''Erebus''' or '''Erebos''' or '''Erebes''' ([[English language|English]] translation: "deep [[black]]ness/[[dark]]ness or shadow") was the son of a primordial god, [[Chaos (mythology)|Khaos]], and represented the personification of darkness and shadow, which filled in all the corners and crannies of the world. His name is used interchangeably with Tartarus and Hades since Erebus is often thought of as part of the underworld. Erebus married his sister [[Nyx]] (goddess of the night) and their children included [[Aether (mythology)|Aether]], [[Hemera]], [[Nemesis (mythology)|Nemesis]], and [[Charon (mythology)|Charon]].
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel

In Greek mythology, Erebus or Erebos or Erebes (English translation: "deep blackness/darkness or shadow") was the son of a primordial god, Khaos, and represented the personification of darkness and shadow, which filled in all the corners and crannies of the world. His name is used interchangeably with Tartarus and Hades since Erebus is often thought of as part of the underworld. Erebus married his sister Nyx (goddess of the night) and their children included Aether, Hemera, Nemesis, and Charon.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Erebus" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on research by Jan-Willem Geerinck. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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