Dutch-language literature  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
Revision as of 11:51, 7 December 2010
Jahsonic (Talk | contribs)

← Previous diff
Revision as of 00:33, 8 January 2011
Jahsonic (Talk | contribs)

Next diff →
Line 6: Line 6:
*[[List of Dutch writers]] *[[List of Dutch writers]]
*[[Dutch language literature]] *[[Dutch language literature]]
-*[[Dutch language]]+* [[Dutch folklore]]
*[[Flemish literature]] *[[Flemish literature]]
*[[Tachtigers]] *[[Tachtigers]]
 +* [[Flemish literature]]
 +* [[List of Dutch language writers]]
== Canon == == Canon ==

Revision as of 00:33, 8 January 2011

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Similar to other literary traditions Dutch literature is not restricted to the Netherlands alone. Dutch-language authors do not necessarily have to be from the Netherlands, as Dutch literature is or was also produced in other Dutch-speaking regions, such as Belgium, Suriname, the Netherlands Antilles, French Flanders and the former Dutch East Indies (present-day Indonesia). In its earliest stages, Dutch literature is defined as those pieces of literary merit written in one of the Dutch dialects of the Low Countries. Before the seventeenth century, there was no unified standard language; the dialects that are considered Dutch diverged evolved from Old Frankish around the 5th century.

See also

Canon




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Dutch-language literature" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools