Decriminalization  

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-:''[[Sodomy laws in the United States]]''+ 
-Except for [[Illinois]], which [[decriminalize]]d [[sodomy]] in [[1961]], [[homosexual acts]], even between consenting adults acting in private homes, were a criminal offense in every U.S. state at the time the [[Stonewall Riots]] occurred: "An adult convicted of the crime of having sex with another consenting adult in the privacy of his or her home could get anywhere from a light fine to five, ten, or twenty years—or even life—in prison. In 1971, twenty states had 'sex psychopath' laws that permitted the detaining of homosexuals for that reason alone. In Pennsylvania and California sex offenders could be locked in a mental institution for life, and [in] seven states they could be castrated." (''[[Stonewall: The Riots That Sparked the Gay Revolution]]'', by [[David Carter]], p. 15) [[Castration]], [[emetics]], [[hypnosis]], [[electroshock therapy]] and [[lobotomies]] were used by psychiatrists to attempt to cure homosexuals through the 1950s and 1960s.(Katz, pp. 181–197.)(Adam, p. 60.)+'''Decriminalization''' is the abolition of [[crime|criminal]] [[sentence (law)|penalties]] in relation to certain acts, perhaps retroactively, though perhaps regulated permits or fines might still apply (for contrast, see: [[Legalization]]). The reverse process is [[criminalization]].
 + 
 +Decriminalization reflects changing social and [[moral]] views. A society may come to the view that an act is not harmful, should no longer be criminalized, or is otherwise not a matter to be addressed by the [[criminal justice]] system. Examples of subject matter which have been the subject of changing views on criminality over time in various societies and countries include:
 + 
 +*[[abortion]]
 +*[[breastfeeding in public]]
 +*[[drug possession]], and [[recreational drug use]]
 +*[[euthanasia]]
 +*[[homosexuality]]
 +*[[polygamy]]
 +*[[prostitution]]
 +*[[public nudity]]
 +*[[Ergogenic use of anabolic steroids|steroid use in sport]]
 + 
 +While decriminalized acts are no longer crimes, they may still be the subject of regulation; for example, the licensing and regular medical testing of prostitutes, or a monetary penalty in place of a criminal charge for the possession of a decriminalized drug. This should be contrasted with [[legalization]], which removes all or most legal detriments from a previously illegal act.
 + 
 +==Drug-use decriminalisation topics==
 +*[[Cannabis rescheduling]]
 +*[[Decriminalization of non-medicinal marijuana in the United States]]
 +*[[Places that have decriminalized marijuana in the United States]]
 +*[[Legal history of marijuana in the United States]]
 +*[[Legality of cannabis by country]]
 +*[[Legal and medical status of cannabis]]
 +*[[Legality of cannabis]]
 +*[[Cannabis legalization in Canada]]
 +*[[Marijuana Policy Project]]
 +*[[Colorado Amendment 44 (2006)]]
 +*[[War on Drugs]]
 +*[[Law Enforcement Against Prohibition]]
 + 
 +==See also==
 +*[[Timeline of LGBT history]]
 +*[[Legalization]]
 +*[[Liberalization]]
 +*[[Prohibition]]
 +*[[Public order crime]]
 +*[[victimless crime (political philosophy)|Victimless Crime]]
 +*[[Legal issues of anabolic steroids]]
 +*[[Sex trade (Canada)]]
 +*[[Sex worker]]
 +*[[Sodomy law]]
 + 
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
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Decriminalization is the abolition of criminal penalties in relation to certain acts, perhaps retroactively, though perhaps regulated permits or fines might still apply (for contrast, see: Legalization). The reverse process is criminalization.

Decriminalization reflects changing social and moral views. A society may come to the view that an act is not harmful, should no longer be criminalized, or is otherwise not a matter to be addressed by the criminal justice system. Examples of subject matter which have been the subject of changing views on criminality over time in various societies and countries include:

While decriminalized acts are no longer crimes, they may still be the subject of regulation; for example, the licensing and regular medical testing of prostitutes, or a monetary penalty in place of a criminal charge for the possession of a decriminalized drug. This should be contrasted with legalization, which removes all or most legal detriments from a previously illegal act.

Drug-use decriminalisation topics

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Decriminalization" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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