Concrete  

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 +[[Image:DSC09076.JPG|thumb|left|200px|[[Paris 16ème - U.E.I. Murat - Locaux France Telecom]]<br><small>Photo © [[JWG]]</small>]]
 +{| class="toccolours" style="float: left; margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 2em; font-size: 85%; background:#c6dbf7; color:black; width:30em; max-width: 40%;" cellspacing="5"
 +| style="text-align: left;" |
 +"[[Denys Lasdun]] insisted that each shuttering plank be used only twice, once on either side, so as not to erode the qualities of the [[wood grain]] through over-use." --''[[Brutalism]]'' (2018) by Billy Reading
 +|}
 +[[Image:Brutalism at the Schoonselhof. Unidentified grave seen from the back (rear)..jpg|thumb|right|200px|[[Brutalism]] at the [[Schoonselhof cemetery]]. Jack Godderis [[headstone]] seen from the back (rear).
 +<br><small>Photo © [[JWG]]</small>]]
[[Image:The Crystal Palace.jpg|thumb|right|200px|The usage of new materials such as [[iron]], [[steel]], [[concrete]] and [[glass]] is ascribed an important place, with [[the Crystal Palace]] by [[Joseph Paxton]] to house the [[Great Exhibition]] of [[1851]]. Historians have seen [[the Crystal Palace]] as a reaction to the [[eclecticism]] and "[[poor taste]]" of the [[Victorian Era]] fuelled by the possibilities of the [[Industrial Revolution]].]] [[Image:The Crystal Palace.jpg|thumb|right|200px|The usage of new materials such as [[iron]], [[steel]], [[concrete]] and [[glass]] is ascribed an important place, with [[the Crystal Palace]] by [[Joseph Paxton]] to house the [[Great Exhibition]] of [[1851]]. Historians have seen [[the Crystal Palace]] as a reaction to the [[eclecticism]] and "[[poor taste]]" of the [[Victorian Era]] fuelled by the possibilities of the [[Industrial Revolution]].]]
{{Template}} {{Template}}
-'''Concrete''' is a [[composite material|composite]] widely used for making [[architectural structure]]s, [[foundation (engineering)|foundations]], brick/[[Concrete masonry unit|block]] walls, [[Sidewalk|pavements]], bridges/[[overpass]]es, highways, runways, [[parking]] structures, [[dam]]s, pools/[[reservoirs]], pipes, [[foundation (engineering)|footings]] for gates, [[fence]]s and [[Utility pole|poles]] and even [[boat]]s.+'''Concrete''' is a [[composite material|composite]] widely used for making [[architectural structure]]s.
Famous concrete structures include the [[Hoover Dam]], the [[Panama Canal]] and the Roman [[Pantheon, Rome|Pantheon]]. Famous concrete structures include the [[Hoover Dam]], the [[Panama Canal]] and the Roman [[Pantheon, Rome|Pantheon]].

Current revision

"Denys Lasdun insisted that each shuttering plank be used only twice, once on either side, so as not to erode the qualities of the wood grain through over-use." --Brutalism (2018) by Billy Reading

Brutalism at the Schoonselhof cemetery. Jack Godderis headstone seen from the back (rear). Photo © JWG
Enlarge
Brutalism at the Schoonselhof cemetery. Jack Godderis headstone seen from the back (rear).
Photo © JWG
The usage of new materials such as iron, steel, concrete and glass is ascribed an important place, with the Crystal Palace by Joseph Paxton to house the Great Exhibition of 1851. Historians have seen the Crystal Palace as a reaction to the eclecticism and "poor taste" of the Victorian Era fuelled by the possibilities of the Industrial Revolution.
Enlarge
The usage of new materials such as iron, steel, concrete and glass is ascribed an important place, with the Crystal Palace by Joseph Paxton to house the Great Exhibition of 1851. Historians have seen the Crystal Palace as a reaction to the eclecticism and "poor taste" of the Victorian Era fuelled by the possibilities of the Industrial Revolution.

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Concrete is a composite widely used for making architectural structures.

Famous concrete structures include the Hoover Dam, the Panama Canal and the Roman Pantheon.

Concrete technology was known by the ancient Romans and was widely used in the Roman Empire—the Colosseum was built largely of concrete and the concrete dome of the Pantheon is the world's largest. After the Empire was destroyed, use of concrete became scarce until the technology was re-pioneered in the mid-18th century.

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