Cinema  

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"With the arrival of cinema, French philosopher Henri Bergson felt the need for new ways of thinking on movement and coined the terms "image-temps" and "image-mouvement" in Matter and Memory (1896). Gilles Deleuze, another French philosopher, took Matter and Memory to explain his views in his Cinéma I & II (1983-1985)." --Sholem Stein


"Romantic authors such as Novalis or Jean Paul, while anticipating the Expressionist notions of visual delirium and of a continual state of effervescence, also seem almost to have foreseen the cinema's consecutive sequences of images. In the eyes of Schlegel in Lucinde, the loved one's features become indistinct: 'very rapidly the outlines changed, returned to their original form, then metamorphosed anew until they disappeared entirely from my exalted eyes.' And the Jean Paul of the Flegeljahre says: 'The invisible world wished, like chaos, to give birth to all things together; the flowers became trees, then changed into columns of cloud; and at the tops of the columns flowers and faces grew. In Novalis's novel Heinrich von Ofterdingen there are even superimpositions."--The Haunted Screen (1952) by Lotte H. Eisner

 A simple example of a cliché in an art form is that of a western film where two men face each other on a dusty and empty road; one dons a black hat, the other white. Independent of any external meaning, there is no way to tell what the situation might mean, but due to the long development of the "western" genre, it is clear to the informed audience that they are watching a gunfight showdown between a good guy and a bad guy.
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A simple example of a cliché in an art form is that of a western film where two men face each other on a dusty and empty road; one dons a black hat, the other white. Independent of any external meaning, there is no way to tell what the situation might mean, but due to the long development of the "western" genre, it is clear to the informed audience that they are watching a gunfight showdown between a good guy and a bad guy.
This page Cinema is part of the film series.Illustration: screen shot from L'Arrivée d'un train en gare de La Ciotat
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This page Cinema is part of the film series.
Illustration: screen shot from L'Arrivée d'un train en gare de La Ciotat

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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel

Cinema may refer to:

  • Film, a series of still images which, when shown on a screen, creates the illusion of moving image
  • Filmmaking, the process of making a film
  • Movie theater, a building in which films are shown

Etymology

Borrowing from French cinéma, shortening of cinématographe (term coined by the Lumière brothers in the 1890s), from Ancient Greek κίνημα (kínēma, “movement”)

Namesakes

  • Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema is a feminist film essay by British academic Laura Mulvey, written in 1973 and first published in 1975.
  • What is Cinema? (original French Qu'est-ce que le cinéma?) is a collection of film essays by André Bazin
  • Cinema Paradiso, a 1988 Italian romantic drama film written and directed by Giuseppe Tornatore.
  • Expanded Cinema by Gene Youngblood (1970), the first book to consider video as an art form
  • To Each His Own Cinema (Chacun son cinéma : une déclaration d'amour au grand écran) is a 2007 French anthology
  • The Pervert's Guide to Cinema (2006) is a two-hour documentary by Sophie Fiennes, scripted and presented by Slavoj Žižek.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Cinema" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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