Pornographoi  

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"You, you teacher of love, are in no respect better than Amasis of Elis, whom Theophrastus, in his treatise On Love, says was extraordinarily addicted to amatory pursuits. And a man will not be much out who calls you a pornographer [πορνογράφος], just as they call Aristeides and Pausanias and Nicophanes painters [ζωγράφοι]. And Polemon mentions them, as painting these subjects exceedingly well, in his treatise On the Pictures at Sicyon." --Deipnosophistae[1]

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Pornographoi were a group of painters identified by Athenaeus in the Deipnosophistae. They are Aristides of Thebes, Pausanias, and Nicophanes. They excelled in the portraits of courtesans; hence their name.

The full fragment reads:

"And do you dare to talk in this way, you who are not "rosy-fingered", as Cratinus says, but who have one foot made of cow-dung [ Aristophanes, Frogs_294 ], and carry around the leg of your namesake the poet [Myrtilus]? You spend all your time in wineshops and inns, although Isocrates the orator has said, in his Areopagitic Oration [ 49 ], "But not one of their servants ever would have ventured to eat or drink in a wineshop; for they studied to keep up the dignity of their appearance, and not to behave like buffoons." And Hypereides, in his oration against Patrocles (if, at least, the speech is a genuine one), says that they forbade a man who had dined at a wineshop from going up to the Areopagus. [22.] G [567] But you, you sophist, spend your time in wineshops, not with your friends (ἑταίρων), but with prostitutes (ἑταιρῶν), having a lot of female pimps about you, and always carrying about these books of Aristophanes, and Apollodorus, and Ammonius, and Antiphanes, and also of Gorgias the Athenian, who have all written about the prostitutes at Athens. Oh, what a learned man you are! how far are you from imitating Theomander of Cyrene, who, as Theophrastus, in his treatise On Happiness, says, used to go about and profess that he gave lessons in prosperity. You, you teacher of love, are in no respect better than Amasis of Elis, whom Theophrastus, in his treatise On Love, says was extraordinarily addicted to amatory pursuits. And a man will not be much out who calls you a pornographer [πορνογράφος], just as they call Aristeides and Pausanias and Nicophanes painters [ζωγράφοι]. And Polemon mentions them, as painting these subjects exceedingly well, in his treatise On the Pictures at Sicyon."[2]

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